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Speeding Up Medicare Lien Resolution – Tips & Tricks

Generally, a Medicare lien resolution time line is as follows:

  1. Report to the COBC – Day 1;
  2. COBC transfers the lien file to the MSPRC (2-4 days);
  3. MSPRC sends a “Rights & Responsibilities Letter” to both the attorney and the client (10-15 days);
  4. MSPRC sends a Conditional Payment Letter to the client, and to any authorized representatives (65 days);
  5. At this point, and if the lien is satisfactory, you must send a Notice of Settlement to the MSPRC.  You will receive a Final Lien Demand in 14-21 days;
  6. After receipt of the Final Lien Demand, you have a 65 day grace period to pay the lien before interest above 10% begins to accrue;
  7. If the lien is not satisfactory after step 5, you must dispute the ICD-9 codes via letter (this is the way you negotiate with Medicare).  The MSPRC will then send a new Conditional Payment Letter in approximately 45 days;
  8. If the new lien is now satisfactory, proceed with steps 5 and 6.

Can you speed up this process?  Not exactly.  The only way to truly speed up the lien resolution process is to act as efficiently as possible.  This means that you should report to the COBC on the day you file your case.  You should do so even sooner if you expect to settle pre-suit.  This is the first way to resolve your liens faster.

Next, you must limit your review periods as much as possible.  At Lien Resolution Services, we strive to audit and review each lien within one full day of receipt.  We send disputes within two days whenever possible.  This is the second way to resolve your lien faster.

Additionally, you should call the MSPRC as you approach the end of any deadline.  Sometimes you can get new lien numbers over the phone.  While you will be unable to audit, review, or dispute the numbers without an actual summary, you do gain the monetary knowledge necessary to assist in settlement, or in planning your lien strategy.

Finally, mymedicare.gov provides all documents via electronic format.  But note, you must have access via your client’s password.  Most beneficiaries do not know of or utilize mymedicare.gov; however, it cuts out all “mail time” from the MSPRC (which includes their internal mailing processes).  If you cannot gain access to mymedicare.gov, make sure you check your mail daily, do not let internal mailing systems slow you down.

Unfortunately, there is no true way to make the COBC, MSPRC, or CMS work faster (until after they have missed a deadline).  It is up to you to make sure your internal practices create no additional lag time.  These tips apply to all liens, from Medicaid liens to ERISA liens and anything between.

If you need assistance with any healthcare lien resolution, please contact us.

Ryan J. Weiner
Co-Founder Lien Resolution Services
www.lienresolutionusa.com
https://lienblog.wordpress.com
rweiner@lienresolutionusa.com
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the publisher for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.
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About Ryan J. Weiner

Co-Founder of Lien Resolution Services, LLC, a national healthcare lien resolution firm. Our goal is to assist in the fair administration and resolution of healthcare liens on personal injury cases. Please visit our website for more information: www.lienresolutionusa.com.

One comment on “Speeding Up Medicare Lien Resolution – Tips & Tricks

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